Santorum “apologizes” over his comments re: JFK’s speech

I put that in quotes, because it comes with an outright lie wrapped in with it.

“I’m not a theocrat,” he replied. “I’m not someone who has any evidence anywhere that I’ve ever imposed my values. I have values; I articulate those — as I encourage everybody else to do and respect everybody else’s opinion and difference of opinion.” Tolerance, he added, is what America is all about. Meanwhile, he argued, President Barack Obama is the one who is “imposing his view on people of faith.”

See, what Obama is saying is that your religious beliefs should not be imposed upon others. Let me revisit a quote of his:

Democracy demands that the religiously motivated translate their concerns into universal, rather than religion-specific, values. It requires that their proposals be subject to argument, and amenable to reason. I may be opposed to abortion for religious reasons, but if I seek to pass a law banning the practice, I cannot simply point to the teachings of my church or evoke God’s will. I have to explain why abortion violates some principle that is accessible to people of all faiths, including those with no faith at all.

And that’s it in a nutshell. The United States is not a non-religious country, it’s not an atheist country nor do I really expect or desire it to ever be so. What I do hope is for it to remain secular, and that simply means that you can have all the religion you want in your life, but don’t force it upon me. If your argument for this or that legislation cannot be justified beyond your holy book, then you have to concede that it’s not something that ought to be put in the books.

I could spend days combing through Santorum’s statements about abortion, gay marriage, contraception, public prayer and the like, but the point that we all know is that he is a man who wants to legislate from faith, not use his faith as inspiration to draw universal values. Obama is a man of faith, but one who understands that not everyone shares it. Santorum is a man of faith who wants to force it upon everyone else.

Also worth noting that he pulled that Republican trope of apologizing for what he said without taking back the sentiment expressed in it. Sort of saying, “I’m sorry I said that out loud.” What’s nice is that with the delegates going strongly Romney, I might be able to start complaining about him rather than Ricky, and I’d be far less bothered with that.

Advertisements

One response to “Santorum “apologizes” over his comments re: JFK’s speech

  1. See, speeches like that are one of the reasons I LIKE Obama.  I may hate that he caves in to the wrong people and think he needs a spine, but then he says stuff like that – and does his best to uphold it, IMO – which proves he IS a good person.  Unlike anyone in the GOP.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s