Polls show either a tie or a win for Obama over Romney, Santorum

Depending on which you look at, Obama’s either 10 points ahead, or in a statistical tie.

The interesting thing about the poll that seems to favor Santorum is that it also looks at things in a battleground-state specific way, which does color the results a tad. Why? Because if you add up the “given” states, the ones that are listed as locked for Obama or his opponent, Obama has 182 electoral votes to his opponent’s 145. So even if that poll is accurate and Santorum could edge the dozen most competitive swing states, Obama still has a pretty good margin of victory.

The article also asks people about the health care law, and this quote just infuriates me:

“It seems like it forces you to take health care (coverage), and you don’t really have a say in the matter,” says Beth Leffew, 26, a college student from Cincinnati. She says the president “didn’t really listen to people” when they objected to the proposed bill. “It seems like he just shoved it right through Congress.”

Because, obviously, that’s how legislation works. The president just “shoves” things through Congress. It certainly wasn’t locked in debate for months, requiring dozens of concessions and alterations for the Republicans to let it move through, no. The president just has the power to force bills through Congress. And that’s ignoring the fact that the bill doesn’t force you to buy health insurance. It gets more Americans insured by either requiring employers to take care of it, or make it more affordable for the rest.

This is how propaganda works, kiddos. If Obama does come close to losing, it’ll be thanks to the noise machine convincing people like Beth Leffew that the bill isn’t what it is, and it was passed how it wasn’t.

I also do like it when the media doesn’t correct a flatly false statement.

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One response to “Polls show either a tie or a win for Obama over Romney, Santorum

  1. Presidential elections don’t have to be this way, with “given” states, where voters will be ignored in the general election.

    The National Popular Vote bill would guarantee the Presidency to the
    candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states (and DC).

    Every vote, everywhere, would be politically relevant and equal in
    presidential elections. No more distorting and divisive red and blue state maps. There would no longer be a handful of ‘battleground’ states where voters
    and policies are more important than those of the voters in more than 3/4ths of
    the states that now are just ‘spectators’ and ignored.

    When the bill is enacted by states possessing a majority of the
    electoral votes– enough electoral votes to elect a President (270 of 538), all
    the electoral votes from the enacting states would be awarded to the
    presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and
    DC.

    The bill uses the power given to each state by the Founding Fathers in
    the Constitution to change how they award their electoral votes for President.
    Historically, virtually all of the major changes in the method of electing the
    President, including ending the requirement that only men who owned substantial
    property could vote and 48 current state-by-state winner-take-all laws, have
    come about by state legislative action.

    In Gallup polls since 1944, only about 20% of the public has supported
    the current system of awarding all of a state’s electoral votes to the
    presidential candidate who receives the most votes in each separate state (with
    about 70% opposed and about 10% undecided). Support for a national popular vote
    is strong among Republicans, Democrats, and Independent voters, as well as
    every demographic group in virtually every state surveyed in recent polls in
    closely divided Battleground states: CO – 68%, FL – 78%, IA 75%, MI – 73%, MO –
    70%, NH – 69%, NV – 72%, NM– 76%, NC – 74%, OH – 70%, PA – 78%, VA – 74%, and
    WI – 71%; in Small states (3 to 5 electoral votes): AK – 70%, DC – 76%, DE –
    75%, ID – 77%, ME – 77%, MT – 72%, NE 74%, NH – 69%, NV – 72%, NM – 76%, OK –
    81%, RI – 74%, SD – 71%, UT – 70%, VT – 75%, WV – 81%, and WY – 69%; in
    Southern and Border states: AR – 80%,, KY- 80%, MS – 77%, MO – 70%, NC – 74%,
    OK – 81%, SC – 71%, TN – 83%, VA – 74%, and WV – 81%; and in other states
    polled: CA – 70%, CT – 74%, MA – 73%, MN – 75%, NY – 79%, OR – 76%, and WA –
    77%. Americans believe that the candidate who receives the most votes should
    win.

    The bill has passed 31 state legislative chambers in 21 small,
    medium-small, medium, and large states. The bill has been enacted by 9
    jurisdictions possessing 132 electoral votes – 49% of the 270 necessary to
    bring the law into effect.

    NationalPopularVote

    Follow National Popular Vote
    on Facebook via nationalpopularvoteinc

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